Station renovation details from FoGS

Barriers have been erected around the old ticket office at the station and rumours immediately abound. Thanks to Mike Jarvis, Chairman of Friends of Goostrey Station for explaining the full details of this exciting renovation:

As Chair of FOGS I can clarify the position as we know it in that the building will be restored, by the owners, Network Rail. They will limit the work to the exterior of the building, and they will renew the internal floor and provide utilities. Their plan as announced to FOGS is as follows:

15 – 30 November :strip and renew the floor

3 – 10 December :undertake electrical testing and remove redundant equipment

10 – 19 December: internal soft strip

Renovation of the outside will be carried out then during the period January – June 2019 which overlaps two financial years for budgeting purposes. Owing to the proximity of the high voltage power lines much of the exterior work will have to be done during the night with ”possession” of the line which requires electricity to be switched off completely. The building will be finished in specified heritage colours, principally green and cream as now, rather then in the livery of the franchise holder, Northern Railway.

It is envisaged then that FOGS will be responsible for the decoration of the inside together with installation of sanitary ware, after which the franchise holders, together with FOGS, will be seeking tenants for the building. The tenancy can be for commercial or for community use and for the whole building or a part thereof. We currently have one interested party.

FOGS has been working hard for the past six years to reach this stage. Maintenance of the building is the responsibility of the franchise holders but the previous holder carried out no maintenance. The new holders, some two years ago, argued that the building had deteriorated too much for simple maintenance to be possible but FOGS ,managed to secure the support of the Rail Heritage Trust who agreed that, being one of the last Victorian, wooden, modular buildings, complete with canopy, remaining in the whole country it was worthy of being saved for our heritage. They , therefore, are providing £40K out of a total cost which, we are told, will be over £100K.

We, FOGS have had several false dawns with promises not coming to fruition so have refrained from making any announcements until we could see that work had in fact started.

We trust that dawn will finally break and that the sun will shine again on a restored and refreshed Goostrey station. We shall aim to keep you aware of progress but if you have questions then we shall try to answer them.

Meanwhile our gardening and planting to improve the appearance of the station will continue. It is this work, aided splendidly by the art displays provided by Goostrey Community Primary School and their pupils, that has demonstrated to the railway companies our commitment to our station. which must be of benefit to the whole community. We still need more help and would appreciate your support.

Mike Jarvis, FoGS

Displays at the Station

It’s worth a trip to the station just to see the lovely Remembrance display by Goostrey School…see photos below.

…and now there is an electronic display of train times too (don’t mention Saturdays); fortunately the chap who’d fitted it was still there when the photographs were taken  – as it was reading a fault immediately after he’d packed up!

The lovely old Station Building was being closely inspected today; presumably work to restore the exterior is imminent following the £40,000 grant to Network Rail from the Heritage Railway Trust….great news!  The station opened on 1st Sept 1891, initially with buildings on both side.  The remaining Victorian modular railway building is of a type built between 1860 and 1920 and only a handful remain according to The London Midland Railway Society.

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Jodrell oppose Glamping Site

JBO has opposed the current proposal that includes 10 ‘glamping’ pods, noting “that the impact from the additional potential contribution to the existing level of interference coming from that direction will be moderate to severe”  …..”the pods themselves are likely to offer less shielding than conventional building materials and this site is very close to the telescope”.

Goostrey Parish Council have also objected to the scheme due to conflict with N’hood Plan policies and the lack of footpaths/pavements from the site along the narrow lanes to the village.  Highways have pointed to the lack of car parking spaces on illustrations.

link to application:  18/5000m   Comments by 14th November.

The application, for Mr Barber of Cheshire Country Holidays on Bridge Lane, includes the construction of 10 glamping pods – on wheels covered by decking- a permanent reception/office, store, shop and shower block with parking spaces for 15 vehicles.

Glamping location relative to JBO & village

WW1 memorial tree planted

Lest we forget.

The 18 young men from Goostrey, Twemlow and Allostock who fell in the First World War were honoured at a ceremonial oak tree planting this morning on the Bogbean, organised by the Goostrey branch of the Royal British Legion, who have funded the event along with Goostrey Parish Council.  27 other local men who served and survived were also remembered.

The chairman of Goostrey Parish Council, Cllr Ken Morris, made a very touching tribute (written in full below) and 18 Scouts and Guides from Goostrey laid crosses. The vicar of St Luke’s Church, Rev Heather Buckley, and the Minister of the Methodist Church, Reverend Yvonne Pearson lead the prayers and Mrs Margaret Kettle (lovingly referred to as the Queen Mother of the village) helped plant the tree.  A big thank you must go to Arthur Lamb, Chairman, and the Goostrey Branch of the Royal British Legion, for all their hard work in organising the Centenary tree planting and memorial service.

An oak tree was planted with a memorial plaque in memory of their sacrifice for the community and country.   Photographs below.

A Service of Remembrance was held at St Luke’s at 10.00am Sunday 11th and bells rung at 12.30 to mark the 100th anniversary (along with many churches nationally).  The parade assembled in the Crown Inn car park from 9.15am.

Click here to read the list of the 18 men  , where I have now added links to their stories on the Cheshire County Memorial Project so you can look up individual names.

I would like to thank the Royal British Legion for asking the Parish Council to speak at todays ceremony.  It is a privilege to be able to join with all of you to witness the formal planting of this tree and unveiling of the plaque.  Together we are part of a series of tributes taking place up and down the country.

World War 1 was a most terrible and tragic event. Tomorrow will be exactly 100 years since the signing of the Armistice, when the guns fell silent on the Western Front.  These eventsmarked the beginning of the end of that Great War of 1914-18.

As chairman of the Parish Council, I am honoured to be able to represent the local community in paying our respects for the bravery and sacrifice of those 18 men from Goostrey and surrounding villages who fought and died, during, or as a direct result of, the war.   They were truly heroes and they gave their lives for the freedom we have today.

We have the details of another 27 of our local men who served in the war, they fortunately survived.  We salute them as well.

Its hard to imagine the horror that all those men would have experienced.  Before the war they were living peaceful lives and doing ordinary jobs in and around Goostrey.  Some of them were farm workers, some worked at the Railway Station, one was training to be a doctor, another was an MP.  They lived in roads we are familiar with today, including Bank View, Mill Lane, Main Road and in the Station Cottages.  

Following the outbreak of war, in August 1914 Britain recruited a huge volunteer citizen’s army.  In just 8 weeks three quarters of a million men in Britain had joined up.  The menfrom our villages answered the call of duty.  They volunteered to leave their homes and families to fight for their country in far distant places. Almost in the blink of an eye they were no longer in Goostrey, Twemlow or Allostock, but deep in mud at the Battle of the Somme, the Battles at Ypres and the most horrific Battle of Passchendaele.  Between them they saw active service in many different countries, service in which more than nine million military personnel were killed.

I’m sure that we are also very proud of the fact that two of the men from our villages, were awarded the Military Medal for Bravery.  Another was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and another was mentioned in Dispatches by Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig and was awarded the Military Cross for a conspicuous act of gallantry.

16 of the 18 are commemorated on the war memorial at St Luke’s Church, but we know that many of them are buried where they fell or in graves a long way from home, including in France, Belgium, Greece, Jerusalem and Iraq.   Most were only young men, three died at only 19 years old.  

I’d also like us to remember all those who were affected by the loss of these local men at that time, including their families and friends.   Goostrey and the surrounding villages were much smaller places in 1914.  The impact on those left at home, wives, children, fathers, mothers and all those depending on them must’ve been devastating. Even those who returned were often left severely injured or with permanent disabilities, both physical and psychological.

I expect that everyone living in Goostrey and round about today have parents, grandparents, great grandparents or other relatives who served in the war and as such our lives have also been touched in one way or another.

The phrase ‘Lest we forget’ is often used in connection with the Great War.  I therefore feel it is very appropriate for the Parish Council to join with the Royal British Legion and all of you here today in continuing that pledge by marking the centenary with this plaque, and oak tree.  Both will be a reminder of the fallen heroes in our village, and the debt of gratitude that we owe to those 18 men, for centenaries to come. ”  Councillor Ken Morris, Chairman of Goostrey Parish Council.

 

 

 

Housing at The Grange refused

Outline planning has been refused for 8 houses on the site of The Grange stables and menage off Station Road.  Goostrey PC voted to object and Jodrell Bank Observatory had strongly opposed the proposal.

Link to application: 18/4079C

The reasons for refusal are as follows:

  1. The Local Planning Authority considers that the proposed development would introduce a suburban, residential development (by virtue of the scale massing layout of the proposed dwellings) in this rural area which would not preserve or enhance the character of the locality. It is considered that a residential scheme in this location would not be acceptable in terms of its landscape and visual impact and would lead to an unacceptable form of development within the Open Countryside
  2. The proposed development would impair the efficiency of the Jodrell Bank Radio Telescope which is an internationally important scientific facility.

The planning officer made the following observations:

“In any event it is not considered that the fundamental principle of the replacement of the existing buildings with two storey dwellings (as proposed) would preserve or enhance the character of the area and that the proposed development would have a significant negative impact on the Open Countryside and area. The existing equine use is considered to be appropriate to the character of the area and it is considered that the form/layout of the proposed residential development would assist to erode the landscape character of the area”

“Given the local character of the area, the impact on the landscape and the impact on Jodrell Bank it is not considered that the redevelopment of the application site to a residential use represents sustainable development as detailed within this report.”  Link to full officer’s report.

Grange site refused for 8 houses

East-West divide

I’ve just been chatting to the workmen fixing the sewer etc on a Main Road.

Many will be dismayed to hear that, whilst United Utilities have already replaced a section of pipes, they say it will still take them well into next week before they are able to finish.